A to Z Reading Challenge

It’s time to wrap up your 2019 resolutions and think about what you want to accomplish next year. Most of us consider the same resolutions from year to year. Eat healthier, save money, exercise and so on. While these are all great goals, how about injecting some excitement into your resolutions with a reading challenge?

The A to Z Reading Challenge is one of my favorites and it’s as simple as it sounds. Within the year, you read at least one book with a title that begins with each letter of the alphabet — not including any article (a, an, the) that may be present.

This reading challenge is unique because it gives you the option of staying within your comfort zone or exploring other genres. But most of all, it gives new readers or not-so-much-readers a tangible goal that’s absolutely achievable. Read 26 books in a year? You can do it.

The A to Z Challenge was originally concocted by a mother/daughter blogging team Ginger Mom and Company in 2018. This will be the third year that they’ve sponsored the challenge. With the goal of inspiring readers and writers to be creative, discover new authors and find their next favorite book, the duo incorporates the challenge into their social media and encourage readers to write reviews and leave comments. There are multiple ways to participate. You can contribute via social media, do it alone or encourage your friends to do it with you.

And remember, reading challenges are not just for grown-ups, kids can participate, too. Just bring your little ones to the library and help them find a title beginning with whichever letter you need. This reading challenge is a great way for kids to practice letter recognition and grammar. It also encourages them to explore the library’s youth services department and interact with library staff. You can even add an additional challenge by having siblings or neighborhood kids compete to see who can get all 26 letters completed first.

Here’s a list of 26 titles that will help you complete the A to Z Challenge. Feel free to use these titles or journey out and find your own. Happy reading.

The A List by J.A. Jance
Blood communion: a tale of Prince Lestat by Anne Rice
Covert game by Christine Feehan
The death of Mrs. Westaway by Ruth Ware
The English wife by Lauren Willig
Formula of deception by Carrie Stuart Parks
The girlfriend by Michelle Frances
The Hope Jar by Wanda E. Brunstetter
The immortalists by Chloe Benjamin
Jane Seymour, the haunted queen by Alison Weir
King of ashes by Raymond E. Feist
Leaving Lavender Tides by Colleen Coble
Marry me by sundown by Johanna Lindsey
Noir by Christopher Moore
One day in December by Josie Silver
Plum tea crazy by Laura Childs
The Queen of sorrow by Sarah Beth Durst
Remembrance by Meg Cabot
The Saturday night supper club by Carla Laureano
Tangerine by Christine Mangan
Unbridled by Diana Palmer
Vengeance by Zachary Lazar
Wild hunger by Chloe Neill
Xenocide by Orson Scott Card
Your second life begins when you realize you only have one by Raphaëlle Giordano
Zero sum game by S.L. Huang

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A to Z Reading Challenge

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