Covid-19 Resources

Coronavirus & Your Health

Coronavirus, airborne pathogens, incubation period, deadly, contagious, epidemic, pandemic — these unnerving, dreadful words are popping up in your news and social media feeds in recent days. Honestly, it sounds like one of Robin Cook’s medical thrillers, but it’s not and it can be terrifying, right? Don’t panic. Get the information you need about the viral outbreak as well as learn how to protect you and your family.

Here’s What You Need to Know

What is it?
COVID-19 is a respiratory illness caused by a new coronavirus first identified in Wuhan, China. Cases of the disease are being reported in a growing number of countries including the United States.


How does it spread?

The virus is thought to spread mainly from person-to-person in close contact with one another through respiratory droplets produced when an infected person coughs, sneezes or exhales. The CDC suggests “close contact” be kept to a minimum of six feet with anyone who might be sick — this is twice the distance — compared to what health professionals have defined it in past outbreaks, like SARS.


What are the symptoms?
The most common symptoms are fever, tiredness and dry cough. Some patients may have aches and pains, nasal congestion, runny nose, sore throat or diarrhea. These symptoms are usually mild and begin gradually.


What should I do if I have symptoms?
If you develop symptoms such as fever, cough, or difficulty breathing, stay home and call your healthcare provider.


Free Virtual Screenings for South Carolinians

The Medical University of South Carolina is offering free virtual screenings for anyone in South Carolina who thinks they may be experiencing coronavirus symptoms. You can book a MUSC Virtual Care Visit and speak to a provider online — using the promo code COVID19. You can also call (843) 792-7000 to access the service by phone. MUSC said the healthcare provider you speak with will determine if you need additional in-person case. The free virtual screenings are available 24-hours-a-day.

Prisma Health is also offering free access to virtual screenings for those who think they may have coronavirus. The online tool prevents patients from having to visit an emergency room or doctor’s office. If you’re experiencing coughing, fever or shortness of breath, schedule a Prisma Health Virtual Visit and use the promo code COVID19.



What is a virtual visit?

If you schedule a virtual visit, don’t expect to receive a positive or negative coronavirus test result. The only way to test for coronavirus right now is to have an in-person test done by a medical professional that is then verified by state and federal officials. However, the online visit could help determine if you (and family, friends or coworkers) should be tested for coronavirus.

What about older patients are those with medical conditions?
Older patients and individuals who have severe underlying medical conditions or are immunocompromised should contact their healthcare provider early, even if their illness is mild. If you have severe symptoms, such as persistent pain or pressure in the chest, new confusion or inability to arouse, or bluish lips of face, contact your healthcare provider or emergency room and seek care immediately. Your doctor will determine if you have signs and symptoms of COVID-19 and whether you should be tested.

READ MORE CLOSE

The Statistics

The numbers continue to increase every day — doubling in some countries overnight. The virus has found a foothold on every continent except for Antarctica. Students at Johns Hopkins University’s Whiting School of Engineering began tracking COVID-19 data in real-time with an interactive dashboard, as you can see below.

The World Health Organization Declared the Novel Coronavirus Outbreak a Pandemic

WHO Director General Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus said what has been increasingly obvious for weeks, We’ve been assessing this outbreak around the clock and we’re deeply concerned both by the alarming levels of spread and severity and the alarming levels of inaction. We have therefore made the assessment that COVID-19 can be characterized by pandemic.”

The news came after identified cases doubled in the United States in the space of just two days, Chancellor Angela Merkel in Germany said that 60 to 70 percent of Germans could become infected, and Italy locked down its entire population and warned the world that they were running out of ICU capacity — while experts warned many other countries were on track for large outbreaks and health care capacity issues.

Describing the situation as a pandemic does not change WHO’s assessment of the threat posed by this coronavirus. It doesn’t change what WHO is doing, and it doesn’t change what countries should do. Several countries have demonstrated that this virus can be suppressed and controlled, Ghebreyesus said. — Vox

How to Protect Yourself

  • Wash your hands: wet your hands with clean, running water. Apply soap. Lather your hands, including the backs, between your fingers and under your nails. Scrub for at least 20 seconds. Rinse.
  • Cover your mouth and nose with a tissue when you cough or sneeze, then throw the tissue in a bin and wash your hands. If you don’t have a tissue on hand, cough or sneeze into your elbow rather than your hands.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose and mouth. Viruses often spreads when someone touches a contaminated object and then touch their face. You should also clean and disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces.
  • ‎Seek early medical help by phone if you have a fever, cough and difficulty breathing. Share your recent travel history with healthcare providers.
  • If you’ve returned from an infected area and develop a high temperature, cough, runny nose, sore throat or difficulty breathing, do not leave your home until you’ve been given advice by a doctor.

Answers to Your Most Common Questions

It’s a novel virus named for the crownlike spikes that protrude from its surface. The coronavirus can infect both animals and people and can cause a range of respiratory illnesses from the common cold to more dangerous conditions like Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome, or SARS.

The virus is thought to spread mainly from person-to-person in close contact with one another through respiratory droplets produced when an infected person coughs, sneezes or exhales. These droplets land on objects and surfaces around the person. Other people then catch the virus by touching these objects or surfaces, then touching their eyes, nose or mouth. People can also catch COVID-10 if they breathe in droplets from an infected person who coughs out or exhales droplets. The CDC recommends staying six feet away from a person who is sick.

Illness due to infection is generally mild, especially for children and young adults. However, it can cause serious illness — about 20 percent of people who are infected need hospital care. So, it’s quite normal to worry about how the coronavirus outbreak will affect you and your family.

We can channel our concerns into actions to protect ourselves, our loved ones and our communities. First and foremost among these actions is regular and thorough hand-washing and good respiratory hygiene. Secondly, stay informed and follow the advice of the local health authorities including any restrictions put in place on travel, movement and gatherings.

Early information shows that some people are at higher risk of developing serious illness including older adults, and people who have serious chronic medical conditions (or are immunocompromised) like heart disease, diabetes, high blood pressure, lung disease or cancer.

If you’re at higher risk of getting very sick from COVID-19, you should:

  • Stock up on supplies
  • Take everyday precautions to keep space between yourself and others when you go out in public, keep away from others who are sick
  • Limit close contact and wash your hands often
  • Avoid crowds, cruise travel and non-essential travel

If there’s an outbreak in your community, stay home as much as possible. Watch for symptoms and emergency signs. If you get sick, stay home and call your doctor. — CDC People at Risk for Serious Illness from COVID-19

Only wear a mask if you are ill with COVID-19 symptoms (especially coughing) or looking after someone who may have COVID-19. Disposable face mask can only be used once. If you’re not ill or looking after someone who is, then you’re wasting a mask. There’s a world-wide shortage of masks, so the World Health Organization and CDC urge people to use masks wisely.

While this virus seems to have emerged from an animal source, it’s now spreading from person-to-person. There’s no reason to think that any animals, including pets, in the United States might be a source of infection with this new virus. At this time, there’s no evidence that companion animals including pets can spread or be infected with coronavirus. However, since animals can spread other diseases to people, it’s always a good idea to wash your hands after being around them.

It’s not certain how long the virus that causes COVID-19 survives on surfaces, but it seems to behave like other coronaviruses. Studies suggest that coronaviruses (including preliminary information on COVID-19) may persist on surfaces for a few hours or up to several days. This may vary under different conditions (type of surface, temperature or humidity of the environment). If you think a surface is infected, clean it with disinfectant to kill the virus and protect yourself and others. Clean your hands with an alcohol-based hand rub or wash them with soap and water. Avoid touching your eyes, mouth or nose.

You can reduce your chances of being infected or spreading coronavirus by taking some simple precautions:

  • Regularly and thoroughly clean your hands with an alcohol-based hand rub or wash them with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. Why? Washing your hands with soap and water or using alcohol-based hand rub kills viruses that might be on your hands.
  • Maintain at least 6 feet distance between you and anyone who is coughing or sneezing. Why? When someone coughs or sneezes they spray small liquid droplets from their nose or mouth which may contain virus. If you are too close, you can breathe in the droplets, including the COVID-19 virus if the person coughing has the disease.
  • Avoid touching eyes, nose and mouth. Why? Hands touch many surfaces and can pick up viruses. Once contaminated, hands can transfer the virus to your eyes, nose or mouth. From there, the virus can enter your body and can make you sick.
  • Make sure you, and the people around you, follow good respiratory hygiene. This means covering your mouth and nose with your bent elbow or tissue when you cough or sneeze. Then dispose of the used tissue immediately. Why? Droplets spread virus. By following good respiratory hygiene you protect the people around you from viruses such as cold, flu and COVID-19.
  • Stay home if you feel unwell. If you have a fever, cough and difficulty breathing, seek medical attention but call in advance. Why? National and local authorities will have the most up to date information on the situation in your area. Calling in advance will allow your health care provider to quickly direct you to the right health facility. This will also protect you and help prevent spread of viruses and other infections.
  • Keep up-to-date on the latest coronavirus hotspots (cities or local areas where the virus is spreading quickly). If possible, avoid traveling to places — especially if you’re an older person or have diabetes, high blood pressure heart or lung disease. Why? You have a higher chance of catching COVID-19 in one of these areas.

Protection Measures for People Who are in or Have Recently Visited Areas Where Coronavirus is Spreading

  • Follow the guidance outlined above
  • ‎Self-isolate by staying at home if you begin to feel unwell, even with mild symptoms such as headache, low grade fever (100.4 F or above) and slight runny nose, until you recover. If it’s essential for you to have someone bring you supplies or to go out — to buy food, etc. —  you should wear a mask to avoid infecting others. Why? Avoiding contact with others and visits to medical facilities will allow them operate more effectively and help protect you and others from possible COVID-19 and other viruses.
  • ‎If you develop fever, cough and difficulty breathing, seek medical advice promptly as this may be due to a respiratory infection or other serious condition. Call in advance and tell your provider of any recent travel or contact with travelers. Why? Calling in advance will allow your health care provider to quickly direct you to the right health facility. This will also help to prevent possible spread of COVID-19 and other viruses.

If you develop symptoms such as fever, cough, or difficulty breathing, stay home and call your healthcare provider.

 

Free Virtual Screenings for South Carolinians

The Medical University of South Carolina is offering free virtual screenings for anyone in South Carolina who thinks they may be experiencing coronavirus symptoms. You can book a MUSC Virtual Care Visit and speak to a provider online — using the promo code COVID19. You can also call (843) 792-7000 to access the service by phone. MUSC said the healthcare provider you speak with will determine if you need additional in-person case. The free virtual screenings are available 24-hours-a-day.

Prisma Health is also offering free access to virtual screenings for those who think they may have coronavirus. The online tool prevents patients from having to visit an emergency room or doctor’s office. If you’re experiencing coughing, fever or shortness of breath, schedule a Prisma Health Virtual Visit and use the promo code COVID19.



What is a virtual visit?

If you schedule a virtual visit, don’t expect to receive a positive or negative coronavirus test result. The only way to test for coronavirus right now is to have an in-person test done by a medical professional that is then verified by state and federal officials. However, the online visit could help determine if you (and family, friends or coworkers) should be tested for coronavirus.

What about older patients are those with medical conditions?
Older patients and individuals who have severe underlying medical conditions or are immunocompromised should contact their healthcare provider early, even if their illness is mild. If you have severe symptoms, such as persistent pain or pressure in the chest, new confusion or inability to arouse, or bluish lips of face, contact your healthcare provider or emergency room and seek care immediately. Your doctor will determine if you have signs and symptoms of COVID-19 and whether you should be tested.

Want to Learn More?

Resources & Information

Community Resources

Scroll To Top

Restaurants & Shopping (1)

Scroll To Top
Scroll To Top
Scroll To Top
Scroll To Top
Scroll To Top
Scroll To Top
Scroll To Top
Scroll To Top

Career & Employment

Scroll To Top
Scroll To Top
Scroll To Top

Small Business

Scroll To Top
Scroll To Top

Education & Learning

Scroll To Top

Animals (3)

Scroll To Top
Scroll To Top
Scroll To Top
Scroll To Top
Scroll To Top
Scroll To Top
Scroll To Top
Scroll To Top
Scroll To Top

Entertainment & Recreation

Scroll To Top

Aquarium & Zoo Live Cams (5)

Scroll To Top

Crafts, Hobbies & DIY (2)

Scroll To Top

Get Outside (3)

Scroll To Top
Scroll To Top
Scroll To Top
Scroll To Top

Health & Wellness

Scroll To Top
Scroll To Top
Scroll To Top
Scroll To Top

Life Hacks

Scroll To Top

Adjusted Library Services

As the world faces a challenging public health situation, Lexington County Public Library will be closed to the public to help prevent the spread of novel coronavirus (COVID-19). Our highest priority is the health and well-being of our patrons, staff and volunteers. The library is closely monitoring the latest information and guidelines provided by the CDC and DHEC and we’ll continue to evaluate services daily. We encourage the public to practice social distancing. The following changes are effective immediately:


  • Loan limits are extended on hard copy books and DVDs to six weeks.
  • Overdue fines will be waived.
  • Book drops are open at all 10 library locations.
  • Patrons can request items (books, DVDs, Playaways, etc.) through our online catalog or by calling the library.
    Materials can be picked up curbside by appointment at any of our 10 locations.
  • In-library computer use is available by appointment. Call your local branch to schedule a time.
  • The Summer Reading Program is happening now through July 31. Participate in virtual programs for all ages on Facebook and YouTube.
  • Ask a Librarian service is available by phone at (803) 785-2681, email at ask@lexcolibrary.com.
    Librarians are also available to answer questions using online chat at our website by clicking the icon at the bottom, right.
  • We’ve temporarily stopped accepting book and DVD donations.
  • Digital resources are available 24/7 including ebooks audiobooks, movies, music, databases & more.

 

The Library Encourages Healthy Spaces & Best Practices

  • Stay home if not feeling well or experiencing flu-like symptoms. Contact a doctor.
  • Cover mouth with a tissue, elbow or upper sleeve when coughing or sneezing. Discard used tissues immediately.
  • Wash hands often for at least 20 seconds with soap and water or use hand sanitizer that is at least 60% alcohol.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose or mouth.
  • Practice social distancing. Try to keep an optimal six-foot distance from other people.
  • Minimize the sharing of equipment such as computers, phones and pens — when unavoidable — use sanitizing wipes between uses.
ajax-loader
Our libraries are closed to the public but curbside pickup and online programs are now available. Book drops are open.LEARN MORE »
+

Ask a Librarian

Covid-19 Resources

Ask a Librarian is a service available to patrons via phone or email (online chat coming soon). Not only can librarians provide book recommendations for you and your child, they can help you in so many other ways — they can actually help you find answers to the world’s most fascinating questions. For example, they can …

  • Find answers to questions for research in any area of study from aeronautics to zoology
  • ‎Locate information so you can develop a business plan, find sales leads to grow your business and research your competitors
  • ‎Identify alternative approaches to health care and wellness, focusing on perspectives of complementary, holistic and integrated health
  • ‎Research businesses by industry or segment and company size; employment statistics, mapping and traffic modeling
  • ‎And yes, even help with the tough homework assignments students have in elementary, middle, high school or college

So, the real question is … What are you going to Ask a Librarian?